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Campbell University (Norman A. Wiggins School of Law)




The School of Law is a highly demanding, purposely small, intensely personal community of faculty and students whose aim, guided by transcendent values, is to develop lawyers who possess moral conviction, social compassion, and professional competence and who view the practice of law as a calling to serve others and to create a more just society. The School of Law provides a liberal arts legal education designed to assist talented students in developing strong moral character, disciplined and creative minds, and superb professional skills for purposeful lives of leadership and service to their communities. We intend that all students think, speak, and write sensibly, make relevant and valid judgments, discriminate among values, and maintain the highest standards of professional excellence. In short, we seek to produce graduates ready to deliver the best possible legal services to their clients and communities. To accomplish this goal, our course of instruction is unusually rigorous and demanding. Our faculty holds students to the highest expectations in thinking, preparation, and application. Success comes only as students are fully engaged in learning to analyze the law, construct and evaluate legal arguments, and resolve legal problems. Our small class sizes and rural setting help foster an intellectual community that is focused and determined, yet personal and supportive. Students have to work hard here, but they develop a sense of community with their professors and classmates and they appreciate the academic demands as they enter the practice of law confident that they’re fully prepared. Part of Campbell’s demanding nature comes from our conviction that legal education must be a genuinely “professional” education, combining theoretical inquiry with practical skills. Whether engaged in litigation, transactions, or any other type of practice or public service, a good lawyer must have extensive knowledge and exceptional professional skills. Not only is the Campbell program academically challenging, but it also provides students with comprehensive skills training in planning, counseling, negotiation, legal drafting, trial and appellate advocacy, and alternative forms of dispute resolution. No law school in North Carolina has had greater success in preparing its students for the bar examination and few schools in the United States or elsewhere can equal Campbell’s effectiveness in providing students with practical skills. The faculty of the School of Law is a community of scholars who make teaching their priority and are readily accessible to students. They devote substantial time to serving students as mentors, coaches, and professional role models. All faculty have open-door office policies and are willing to consult regularly with students one-to-one. Our professors are deeply committed to the search for knowledge through meaningful legal scholarship, but never at the expense of their devotion to the academic success and professional development of each student. The School of Law strives to produce highly competent, deeply compassionate lawyers who see the practice of law as a calling to serve others. We want our graduates not only to be successful but also to live unselfishly, considering the needs of others as more important than their own and understanding that reconciling differences is as important as winning cases. Particular emphasis therefore is given to practicing the highest ideals of integrity and civility, seeking transformative justice, promoting reconciliation, and helping those who are most in need of our assistance. In this way, our graduates can become effective advocates for legal and social justice, both in their local communities and in other parts of the world. Our vision is inspired by a perspective not typically heard at other law schools. As part of the Campbell University community, the School of Law shares in the University’s purpose and mission to educate students from a Christian perspective in a caring Christian community. This perspective guides our professional choices, actions, and directions. We believe that laws and legal institutions are subject to a moral order which transcends human authority and judgment. A central premise of this moral order is that all human beings are created in the image of God and are endowed by God with certain natural rights and obligations. These rights and obligations are the cornerstone of true human dignity and must be respected by every political order. We encourage students to examine the relationship between spiritual and legal issues, to explore the theological foundations for law, to think differently about justice and the legal system, and to consider how we can help achieve a more just and merciful society. We intend our faculty and graduates to engage the larger academic, professional, and social communities as thoughtful persons of conscience and conviction who humbly bring a faith perspective to legal and cultural issues with the power of skillful argument and an unfailing commitment to human flourishing. Because we recognize the immeasurable dignity and worth of every person that follow from our creation in the image of God, we seek to preserve a congenial academic environment where everyone is treated with kindness, civility, and respect, and students from all faiths or secular moral traditions are welcome. While the School of Law embraces an intellectual perspective rooted in Christian tradition, it is committed to free and open discussion of ideas and students are under no obligation to embrace any particular way of thinking. The School of Law is housed in two main halls that cover nearly 80,000 square feet. Together, Wiggins Hall and Kivett Hall provide more square feet per student than most law schools in the nation. The halls provide an excellent environment for classroom and courtroom instruction, legal research, meeting and discussion groups. In 1976, the newly formed School of Law was housed in Kivett Hall, the historic building at the center of the Campbell University campus. This distinctive building was built in 1903 to replace the original Buies Creek Academy, which was destroyed by fire. The five-story structure was completely restored and renovated in 1993 and has been recognized in the region as a prime example of adaptive renovation and historic preservation. This new building houses the administrative offices of the law school, two floors of the law library, a computer room, a library conference room, five classrooms, a new state-of-the-art courtroom equipped for videotaping, a student commons and lounge area and law faculty offices. There is space in the law library facility for individual study carrels for each student. Carrels are fully equipped to accept personal computers and future networking possibilities. There is also space for additional Lexis and Westlaw terminals as well as general computer access for word-processing and CALI use. Wiggins Hall has been designed to complement the original law school building, historic Kivett Hall. The brick, arched windows echo the exterior of Kivett, and the interior design features carry through Kivett's distinctive architectural style. Wiggins Hall is named after Dr. Norman Adrian Wiggins, president of Campbell University and the founder of the law school. Attached to Wiggins Hall, Kivett Hall is a distinctive and historic building located at the center of the Campbell University campus. Kivett was built in 1903 to replace the original Buies Creek Academy which was destroyed by fire. The five-story structure was completely restored and renovated in 1993 and has been recognized in the region as a prime example of adaptive renovation and historic preservation. Kivett Hall houses the Law School Placement Center, the Campbell Law Review suite, the student Campbell Law Observer suite, a computer learning center, four floors of law library, two major lecture halls, a second courtroom with full electronic capabilities, student government offices and other student offices, a student lounge, and faculty offices. Students may choose from a variety of on-campus and off-campus housing. Dormitory rooms are available for single students. Single rooms for male law students are provided in Layton Hall, located on the plaza with Kivett Hall. Because of increased undergraduate enrollment, there is a shortage of dormitory housing for female undergraduate students. Unfortunately, this means that there is no dormitory housing available for female graduate students during the upcoming 2004-05 academic year and for the foreseeable future. Meal plans are available to law students. However, law students living in dormitory rooms are not required to board on campus. New students should apply for a room upon acceptance by the school, and returning students must reserve a room on or before May 1 of the sessional year. Law students may use the recreational facilities available to the University community. Adjacent to the University campus is Keith Hills, one of North Carolina's outstanding golf courses which has hosted numerous golf tournaments. Also available are intramural tennis courts and the new Nisbet Tennis Center, which features seven hard-surface, all-weather courts, one of which is a center court, and provides facilities for showering and dressing. Carter Gymnasium is the center for basketball, weight training and volleyball. Johnson Memorial Natatorium, built in 1976, provides indoor swimming. The nearby University track facility, a cross-country course, and miles of rural roads provide excellent jogging areas. There are numerous intramural fields available for team sports. The University, a member of the Atlantic Sun Athletic Conference, competes in NCAA Division I athletics, including soccer, volleyball, tennis, basketball, wrestling, softball, baseball, cross-country and track. The University has two film series, two concert series, and through the Department of Fine Arts, student concerts and plays. John S. Pearson Memorial Infirmary provides medical services for students. It is staffed by a Physician's Assistant under the supervision of a local doctor. Nearby there are two hospitals, a mental health clinic, and a family counseling service. Health care in virtually every specialty is available in nearby towns. A Drug Information Center is maintained on campus by the Pharmacy School. At Campbell, students are more than numbers - they are individuals. Among private, accredited law schools, Campbell has one of the lowest total enrollments in the nation. By design, we have kept Campbell a small, personal place. Faculty members know the students by name, not by a number, and students receive individualized attention. Students know all of their classmates by name and forge friendships that last throughout their careers. The entering class is limited to slightly more than one hundred students. We divide classes into smaller sections in the first-year required courses so that some of the classes will be as small as 35 students and others as large as 75. The small size allows us to provide an extensive first-year research and writing course. Campbell's trial and appellate advocacy program is one of the most extensive and demanding in the country. In addition to the full-time faculty, the law school uses over 250 lawyers and judges each year to assist in the training of the students. This program has received the prestigious Emil Gumpert Award presented by the American College of Trial Lawyers. Each student in the second year performs an appellate argument before a panel of judges consisting of practicing lawyers, District Court and Superior Court Judges, Judges from the North Carolina Court of Appeals, and Justices from the North Carolina Supreme Court. Each student will try at least one jury trial and argue one appellate argument by the time he or she graduates. Students who never plan to do any trial work find that the skills taught are used throughout the adversarial system. Our program is designed so that the students actually perform and are not just lectured to. The School of Law maintains an academic program consistent with its character and goals. The curriculum is the product of the thought of legal educators, lawyers, judges, and lay persons. It is not static, and constant evaluation and revision of the program have occurred and will continue through the years in order to meet the needs of Campbell's students and the public they will serve. Several features of Campbell's program are unique and worthy of mention. While relying heavily on the case method of study, particularly in the first year, methods of instruction will vary widely from class to class, depending upon the material to be taught. Instruction is geared not only to impart knowledge, but also to develop the mental skills and attitudes essential to the successful practice of law. The Campbell curriculum is designed to provide a systematic building process for development of skills, attitudes, and a comprehensive body of essential knowledge. For example, while the study of any course indirectly involves the study of the philosophy of law and most law schools offer electives in jurisprudence, few require direct study of this most important subject. Campbell requires a first-year jurisprudence/foundations of law course. This survey of legal thought serves as a foundation for the second- and third-year courses and the practice of law. In the same manner that the required second- and third-year advocacy courses bring into focus the interrelationship of courses required in the first two years of the law school, the first-year foundation courses provide a means for visualizing the usefulness of the advanced curriculum and a framework for construction of a sound legal education and law practice. The goal of Campbell's Norman Adrian Wiggins School of Law is to educate lawyers who will be prepared from the outset of their careers to serve their communities with legal skill and ethical and intellectual leadership, in the noblest tradition of counsellor. Professional skills form an integral part of this legal education. Because lawyers are concerned with the prevention and resolution of disputes, Campbell provides a thorough education in the skills necessary to accomplish these goals. Research and problem-solving skills are essential to this work. Campbell therefore requires legal research and writing courses in both semesters of the first year and emphasizes research and writing in each year of study. Ultimate resolution of disputes may require trials and appeals, and Campbell recognizes that all lawyers should have a sound knowledge of trial and appellate processes. Campbell places each of its students in the courtroom during each year of study, in an integrated program that in 1986 received the American College of Trial Lawyers' Emil Gumpert Award as the outstanding Trial Advocacy Program in the nation. Campbell's Trial and Appellate Advocacy Program is one of the most extensive in the nation in terms of both coverage and student involvement. It consists of three semesters of required courses (the highest number of required trial and appellate advocacy semester hours in the nation) that build on a broad base of knowledge derived from other required courses such as Criminal Procedure, Evidence, Civil Procedure, Criminal Law, Torts, Contracts, and other substantive courses. The program prepares students in the basic skills and procedure necessary for a practice involving litigation. While we recognize that not all of our students intend to become trial lawyers, we believe that skills training in advocacy will better equip our graduates in whatever setting they may ultimately find themselves. We recognize that much of what a lawyer does - in or out of the classroom - involves advocacy in one form or another. Advocacy and other skills courses required at Campbell not only expose all students to the reality of the adversarial process they will eventually encounter, but also equip them to participate in it effectively. Campbell's Trial and Appellate Advocacy Program is nationally recognized. Campbell teams have established a winning tradition by consistently performing well in competitions at the regional and national levels. The Cooperative Program between Handong International Law School (HILS) and Campbell allows students from Campbell to study on a limited basis with students from Handong under faculty from both institutions. Founded in Pohang in 1995, Handong Global University, of which HILS is a part, has quickly gained an academic reputation that places it in the upper echelon of dozens of institutions of higher learning in Korea. HILS shares with Campbell a commitment to excellence in legal education in a Christian context that has as a primary objective the preparation of servant-lawyers with a global perspective. During the summer term, the HILS curriculum has a "perspectives" orientation that enables Campbell students to take up to six (6) credit hours in courses that they might otherwise have little or no opportunity to take. Taught in both Pohang and Seoul, those courses in 2004 include International Business Transactions (2 credit hours), Globalization: Law Reform, Economics, and Development (2 credit hours), and Comparative Asian Law and Culture (1 or 2 credit hours). A student's successful completion of the summer term will satisfy Campbell's non-jurisprudence perspectives requirement. The content of each course is reflective of Handong's geographic and cultural location and includes elements relevant to the increasing economic influence and stature of Korea, the North Korean refugee problem, the stability of and challenges facing Asia's established and emerging democracies, and the contrasts presented by Western traditions and regional communist regimes. The School of Law maintains an academic program consistent with its character and goals. The curriculum is the product of the thought of legal educators, lawyers, judges, and lay persons. The program is under constant evaluation and revision to ensure it meets the needs of the profession, the public, and the professionals we educate. With a student body of slightly more than 300 students, the School of Law is one of the smallest nationally accredited private law schools in the United States. Yet each class has all the diversity one might expect at a large school. Typically, approximately 50% of each class is female. The median age is about 25, with student backgrounds ranging from students directly out of undergraduate schools to second-career students in their fifties. Students come from 83 undergraduate institutions. Many have other graduate degrees, and there have been medical doctors, dentists, engineers, nurses, teachers, certified public accountants, and pharmacists in previous classes. This diversity adds to the character of the student body as students with widely differing backgrounds and ideas share the law school experience. One of Campbell's chief goals in structuring a small law school is to give its students outstanding opportunities for meaningful participation in curricular activities, particularly those involving publication and competition with students from other law schools. Approximately 70 students serve as editors or writers for the Campbell Law Observer. Approximately 35 students serve as editors or staff members of the Campbell Law Review. By the time a law school class graduates, 25% of that class will have represented the law school in regional and national trial advocacy, appellate advocacy, and client counseling competitions. Campbell’s law faculty emphasizes classroom teaching and accessibility to students. It is comprised of noted experts in various areas of law who author numerous national and state law treatises, including Williston on Contracts, Webster’s Real Estate Law in North Carolina, Wiggins’ Wills and Administration of Estates in North Carolina, Shuford North Carolina Civil Practice and Procedure, and North Carolina Law of Damages. Since its founding, one of the chief goals of the School of Law has been to serve as a laboratory for innovation in legal education. To that end, in 1985, the Institute to Study the Practice of Law and Socioeconomic Development (IS • POL•SED) was established. The Institute serves as a research and service center for legal education and the legal profession, particularly for the School of Law and its students. The Institute has organized and cosponsored the National Legal Education Exploratory Conference on Planning and Management Competence. This 1985 convocation of legal educators and bar leaders explored innovative legal education programs. Since that time, the Institute has sponsored regional and national educational programs for lawyers and legal educators. IS• POL•SED has conducted research for the organized bar and independent research on the legal profession. This research has been reported before various forums, including the American Bar Association, National Conference of Bar Presidents, and Center for Creative Leadership. Research has revolved around such topics as the attributes of excellent lawyers, interstate and merging law firms, professionalism, ethics codes, associate training and development, gender and minority issues, death row and other indigent representation, and law firm cultures and quality of life. IS • POL•SED programs have ranged from week-long management skills programs for practicing lawyers to national conferences for law professors on lawyer and law student personality types. Several longitudinal studies are in progress. Student research assistants participate actively in all of these projects. The School of Law is housed in two main halls that cover nearly 80,000 square feet. Together, Wiggins Hall and Kivett Hall provide more square feet per student than most law schools in the nation. The halls provide an excellent environment for classroom and courtroom instruction, legal research, meeting and discussion groups. In 1976, the newly formed School of Law was housed in Kivett Hall, the historic building at the center of the Campbell University campus. This distinctive building was built in 1903 to replace the original Buies Creek Academy, which was destroyed by fire. The five-story structure was completely restored and renovated in 1993 and has been recognized in the region as a prime example of adaptive renovation and historic preservation. Kivett Hall houses the Career Services and Alumni Relations Office, the Campbell Law Review suite, the Campbell Law Observer suite, a computer learning center, four floors of law library, two major lecture halls, a courtroom with full electronic capabilities, student government and other student organization offices, a student lounge, and faculty offices. Wiggins Hall, completed in 1993, was designed to complement historic Kivett Hall. The brick, arched windows echo the exterior of Kivett, and the interior design features carry through Kivett’s distinctive architectural style. Wiggins Hall is named for Dr. Norman Adrian Wiggins, chancellor, third president of Campbell University and the founder of the law school. It houses the administrative offices of the law school, two floors of the law library, a computer lab, a library conference room, five classrooms, a state-of-theart courtroom, a student commons and lounge area, and law faculty offices. Campbell’s law library combines two large floors of research and study areas in Wiggins Hall with a renovated four-floor library space in Kivett Hall. Traditional reading tables, casual seating, conference rooms, and computer labs provide students with a variety of study areas and resources. Students may reserve spacious, individual study carrels with individual light and power outlets. Many carrels have Ethernet connections to the university computer network and the Internet. Wireless network and Internet access are also available in the library and throughout the law school. The law library houses more than 172,000 volumes including all materials necessary to support a basic legal education. Students have easy access to reference material such as all reported decisions of all federal and state appellate courts, federal and state legislation, and administrative rules and regulations. The library subscribes to more than 650 legal periodicals and 250 loose-leaf services, as well as many non-legal periodicals. A collection devoted to treatises on all phases of law and legal research includes 20,000 titles and continues to expand. Selected government documents and pamphlets are also available. The law library maintains a collection of briefs and records for cases decided by the North Carolina Supreme Court, the North Carolina Court of Appeals, the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals, and the United States Supreme Court.





School name:Campbell UniversityNorman A. Wiggins School of Law
Address:P.O. Box 158
Zip & city:NC 27506 North Carolina
Phone:910-893-1750
Web:http://law.campbell.edu
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