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University of Wisconsin




The University of Wisconsin Law School is a top national law school, attracting students from across the country and around the world. Top students are drawn to the UW Law School because of the diversity of our student body, our tradition of excellence, and our law-in-action approach to teaching and learning the law --- an approach that differentiates us from other law schools.

The UW Law School is located at the heart of one of the world's leading research universities and offers students all of the benefits of a large university. And Madison, the state capital, is a beautiful, affordable city strategically situated in the middle of a triangle formed by Chicago, Minneapolis, and Milwaukee.

Each year, an interesting, talented, and diverse group of students choose the University of Wisconsin Law School from among many other schools. Top students select Wisconsin for a variety of reasons, but prominent among them are the quality of education, the law-in-action philosophy, the excellent clinical opportunities, and the resources of a large world-class university in a beautiful city. In addition, the UW Law School is known for its relaxed, friendly atmosphere; its close-knit law school community; and its long-standing international reputation.

With its central location, Wisconsin draws students from both coasts. In addition to the Midwest states, New York, California, Virginia and Texas are well represented, and more than 40% of our students are from outside of Wisconsin. In addition to seeking geographic diversity, the UW Law School seeks students who bring a wide-range of backgrounds, experiences, and perspectives to encourage a full and complete exploration of legal issues within the classroom. Indeed, students of all backgrounds choose to come to the UW Law School because of our historical commitment to creating a highly diverse educational environment in which differing points of view are represented.

The UW Law School's nationally recognized faculty comes from a wide range of backgrounds and offers students strong role models and a variety of experiences. They are leading scholars who are also actively involved in the law. They advise on stem cell issues, represent clients on death row, work with congressional staffers to draft legislation, provide legal advice to poor farmers in the South, and work with the European Union on monetary policy. They are often quoted in the news, they travel around the world, and they are part of what is new and exciting in the legal community..... but first and foremost, they are excellent teachers, committed to their students.

The low student-faculty ratio at the UW Law School allows students to work closely with their professors. Our research faculty members teach at all levels in the curriculum and work closely with our students to provide a strong foundation in law and legal reasoning. A prestigious clinical faculty of more than twenty-five full-time teachers provides additional opportunities for students to receive rigorous training and personal attention through hands-on experiential learning.

The UW Law School also has both a legal research and writing faculty and an experienced adjunct faculty as part of its teaching community. Our adjunct faculty members are highly successful practicing lawyers and judges who bring their specialized knowledge and experience to the classroom, bridging the theoretical and the practical aspects of legal training and making the law come to life.

Students at the UW Law School have many opportunities to experience our law-in-action philosophy -- an approach that differentiates it from other law schools. Our extensive curriculum places an emphasis on the dynamics of the law: how the law both reflects and causes social change, and how the law as it is practiced can differ from the law described in the statutes.

The first-year small-section program teaches the fundamentals of legal analysis and reasoning in a supportive setting. In the first semester, two of each student's classes -- a substantive law class and a legal writing class -- have 25 or fewer students. This gives students the opportunity to receive one-to-one feedback, and, because students from these small sections take all their other classes together, study groups and friendships develop naturally among classmates.

In the second and third years of law school, students have time both to explore the curriculum and to develop the lawyering skills they need. Students choose courses from an extraordinary breadth and depth of offerings: they explore cutting-edge legal issues in the classroom and apply their knowledge in one of our many study-abroad or clinical programs.

op students are drawn to the UW Law School because of its tradition of excellence, but it is the law-in-action philosophy and interdisciplinary opportunities that make Wisconsin one of the most intellectually exciting law schools in the country. The UW Law School's law-in-action tradition also differentiates it from other law schools.

The UW Law School, established in 1868, pioneered the belief that law must be studied in action as it relates to society, and not in isolation. Our legal tradition is a strong part of who we are. The Law School focuses on helping its students understand how law both affects and is affected by every other institutional force in society. Students at the UW Law School have many opportunities to experience law in action. An extensive curriculum places an emphasis on the dynamics of the law -- how the law relates to social change and to society as a whole -- while at the same time emphasizing skills' development. The Law School does this in its classrooms, in its many clinical programs, and in its numerous collaborations among departments and colleges at one of the world's leading research universities.

The first-year program at Wisconsin is designed to teach the fundamentals of legal analysis and reasoning in a supportive setting. Our small-section program is the cornerstone of the first-year curriculum.The students from your small section will be with you in your other classes, making it easy to form study groups and, perhaps more importantly, to form friendships.

In the first semester, two of your classes will be small sections -- a substantive law class and your legal research & writing class. You'll have a small section of a substantive law class (torts, contracts, civil procedure, or criminal) with approximately 24 students, which will give you the opportunity to receive one-to-one feedback on your legal analysis; and you'll have an even smaller research and writing class -- 15 students or less -- to ensure one-to-one feedback on your writing.

In your second and third years of law school you will have time both to explore the curriculum to determine where your interests lie and to develop the lawyering skills you will need when you graduate. You will be able to choose your courses from an extraordinary breadth and depth of offerings, affording you the opportunity to explore cutting-edge legal issues in the classroom and to apply your knowledge in one of our many clinical programs.

The University of Wisconsin Law School is a national law school that prepares students to practice wherever they choose, and our graduates have an excellent record for passing state bar exams across the country. Moreover, graduates who complete specific course requirements and meet character standards are admitted to practice in Wisconsin without a bar examination, also qualifying to practice before the federal courts.

As a first-year student at the University of Wisconsin Law School, you will have an engaging and challenging experience, both in your substantive courses and in your research and writing courses. While careful research and clear and succinct writing may have been required of you before, legal research and writing methods are unique to the legal profession and will require significant new learning.

This new learning is essential to success in law school and in the legal profession. A student who masters the analytic skills taught in substantive courses needs to take the next step and articulate that analysis in writing. The Legal Research and Writing Program, which is part of our Communication & Advocacy Program, guides you in that process through small classes taught by experienced faculty drawn from the legal profession. They are fully aware of what the profession requires of researchers and writers. You will learn by doing. The writing problems you use are reality based and require you to perform the tasks you will face in law school and in your employment during and after law school.

Throughout the program, you receive all the personalized attention you want or need. Our legal research and writing classes are small (11 to 15 students), feedback from teachers is extensive, and learning is hands-on. The law school offers additional individualized instruction to any student who wants more guidance about how to be a successful legal researcher and writer.

Three years sounds like a long time to be in law school, but it means that you have only six semesters to learn how to think like a lawyer, understand the substance of the law, and develop the skills you'll need in your future professional life. We hope to help you plan an academic program that will help make your six semesters interesting and meaningful and ensure that your academic program meets your professional needs.

In the second and third years of law school, students have time both to explore the curriculum and to develop the lawyering skills they need. Our students choose courses from an extraordinary breadth and depth of offerings: they explore cutting-edge legal issues in the classroom and apply their knowledge in one of our many clinical programs.

If you have an interest in a particular area of practice, the practice guides below will give you information both about the courses, clinics, and seminars currently available and about extracurricular activities that will enhance your professional skills and interests. The guides also list the faculty who have an interest or teach in each practice area.

We live in a global society in which new economic, political, and legal issues transcend traditional boundaries and challenge people to solve problems in new ways. The Law School is no stranger to the challenges of globalization. Fourteen professors devote a significant part of their scholarship and teaching to international or comparative law, and many other faculty members integrate analysis of foreign legal developments into their domestic law courses. The Law School hosts international students and professors, bringing diverse international perspectives to the classroom, and the University has one of the largest groups of international students in the country. You also can study with one of the six foreign law faculties with which the Law School has exchange agreements, create your own foreign study program, or participate in the foreign study programs of other U.S. law schools.

The UW Law School offers a broad range of opportunities for students to develop lawyering skills. Simulated and live-client experiences, internships, externships, and classroom skills courses are all a part of the hands-on experiential learning that makes the law come to life for UW Law School students and provides their future employers with mature, confident law graduates.

The Law School also has a number of centers and institutes that serve varying educational missions and constituent groups. These range from a center focused on East Asian Legal Studies to one on Impaired Driving.

An important indication of the breadth of interest within the student body is the range of extracurricular activities and organizations in which students participate. University of Wisconsin Law School students have a wide range of choices and are active participants in many organizations ranging from professional groups to intramural sports. And if no organization exists to suit your particular needs and interests, we encourage you to start one. In recent years, students have begun a criminal law association, an alternative dispute resolution society, and an organization for non-traditional students, to name a few.

The Student Bar Association is a self-governing organization with a council composed of seven representatives from each of the three classes plus a president and two vice-presidents elected by the student body at large. The association acts generally for the student body in Law School matters. The officers and council of the association appoint the student members of various Law School committees. These committees play an important role in the governance of the Law School, and the student committee members work to ensure representation of student views in this process.

A wealth of specialized student interest organizations provide outstanding opportunities to explore your interests with your fellow students. In addition, there are many student activities, such as law journals, mock trial, and moot court that build legal skills, and activities such as the Dean's Cup and Law Revue that are great ways to meet people and have fun. Here's more information about the organizations and activities at the UW Law School.



School name:University of WisconsinLaw School
Address:975 Bascom Mall
Zip & city:WI 53706 Wisconsin
Phone:608-262-2240
Web:http://www.law.wisc.edu
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