Law schools » United States » North Carolina » Durham

Duke University (Duke Law School)




Duke Law School was established as a graduate and professional school in 1930. Its mission is to prepare students for responsible and productive lives in the legal profession. As a community of scholars, the Law School also provides leadership at the national and international levels in efforts to improve the law and legal institutions through teaching, research and other forms of public service.

The Law School is an integral part of one of the nation's foremost research universities. Duke's origins were in Randolph County where, in 1838, the Methodist and Quaker communities formed Union Institute to educate their children. The school was chartered by the state in 1851 as Normal College and granted the authority to grant degrees in 1853. In 1859, its mission was expanded to educate ministers and its name changed to Trinity College, which relocated to Durham in 1892. In 1924, a grant from James Buchanan Duke made possible its transformation into Duke University, with the advice from Mr. Duke that "courses at this institution be arranged, first, with special reference to the training of preachers, teachers, lawyers and physicians, because these are most in the public eye, and by precept and example can do most to uplift mankind."

Although Duke is young by comparison to other major American universities, its academic programs and professional schools together have attained an international stature and a reputation for quality and innovation that few universities can match. Among the Law School's unique strengths are an extensive network of interdisciplinary collaboration across the Duke campus and an emphasis in teaching and research initiatives addressing global and international issues.

Duke Law School is located in central North Carolina near the cultural and research resources of three other major universities and the high-technology business and research centers of the Research Triangle Park. Situated in 7,700 acres of undeveloped forest and 30 miles of recreational trails, Duke is easily accessible to the Blue Ridge Mountains to the west and the state's many beaches to the east. The climate is mild, with spring beginning as early as February and fall reaching well into November. Raleigh-Durham International Airport is a 20 minute drive from the Law School; Washington DC is less than an hour's flight.

Duke Law School offers a legal education and life experience built around three central precepts: challenge, engage, and lead.

These core tenets inform everything we do. Faculty challenge students to think, write, advocate, and solve problems as lawyers. Students are challenged to assume responsibility for the quality of their community, and to become leaders. They also challenge one another in academic debates in and out of class, pro bono activities, and organized student activities such as moot court, law journals, and special-interest clubs and organizations.

Faculty expect students to be engaged in class and in the life of the Law School, and students expect to play an active role in shaping their own opportunities. At Duke, which is relatively small in relation to its peer schools, students and faculty form an unusually collaborative community that supports students in acquiring the knowledge, experience and leadership skills that are the hallmark of a quality legal education. This combination of rigorous intellectual training and strength of community gives Duke Law its truly unique niche among the top-rated law schools in the country.

Leadership is also a critical value at Duke. The faculty includes established scholars who are leaders in their respective fields, brilliant junior faculty quickly developing international reputations of their own, and experienced practitioners who are at the top of their profession – and fabulous teachers besides. Members of our faculty participate as experts, often with student assistance, in legal reform efforts pertaining to the significant public issues of our day. And the Law School itself is a leader in some of the most exciting developments in legal education, including innovative teaching technologies in the classroom, a broad array of interdisciplinary degree programs, and the integration of international perspectives into the curriculum.

First-year students begin their study of law through the traditional core courses in civil procedure, constitutional law, contracts, criminal law, property, and torts. First-year students also take a research and writing course from one of the highest quality legal research and writing programs in the country.

From this first-year foundation, Duke has built an extensive upper-class curriculum that blends traditional coursework with an extensive array of practical skills courses and clinics, and opportunities to study closely in small groups with faculty, such as research tutorials and an innovative “reading in ethics” series in which up to eight students read and study selected books with a faculty member in a year-long discussion group.

Duke Law School's focus on interdisciplinary studies and programs extends across the Duke campus and around the world. In fact, 25 percent of our students are in joint-degree programs — more than any other top law school.

Duke is the only elite law school in the country that allows students to earn both a law degree and a master's degree in three years. Students pursuing a JD/MA, JD/MS or JD/LLM enroll in June and begin their first-year curriculum prior to the JD students, who enroll in August. For academic joint-degree programs, students need not apply separately to the Graduate School or take the Graduate Record Exam (GRE). Instead, they include a statement of interest with their Law School applications, and the Law School admissions department will work with the graduate department to make the admissions decision.

Another advantage of Duke’s joint degree program is that students do not pay separately for Graduate School courses. Students simply pay for three years of law school and one summer session.

In addition to its academic joint-degree programs, the Law School also offers several professional joint-degree programs through formal agreements with the Duke Divinity School, Fuqua School of Business, the Medical School, the Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences and the Terry Sanford Institute for Public Policy, several of which are located in close proximity to one another. Students in the four-year joint-degree professional programs usually spend their first year at the Law School, and then their second year in the non-legal program of study. During the third and fourth years, students take courses at both schools. Students must apply separately to each school to qualify for a professional joint-degree program.

The Law School has pioneered a distinctive three-year, joint-degree program that makes it possible for students to concurrently earn a JD and a Master of Laws in International and Comparative Law. Students matriculate in June and take a portion of their first-year curriculum during that summer. During the first half of the following summer, students attend one of Duke’s Institutes of Transnational Law. The remainder of their curriculum is completed during three years of fall and spring semesters. Summer Institutes are located in Geneva and Hong Kong.

The Law School and Fuqua School of Business have established a combined four-year program in law and graduate level business administration. Acceptance into this program requires applying separately for admission to each school. The students in the JD/MBA program may enroll the first year in either the Fuqua School of Business or the Law School. If the student begins in the former, the first-year curriculum is the same as that of other Fuqua students; if the student begins in the latter, the first-year curriculum is the same as that of other law students. The student’s second year consists of the full first-year program of the other school. In the third and fourth years of the program, the student takes courses in both schools. Approximately two-thirds of these courses are taken in the Law School.

The Law School and Medical School have established a combined six-year program in legal and medical education. Acceptance into this program requires applying separately for admission to each school. The student in the JD/MD program begins the six-year course of study in the School of Medicine. As in the regular MD program, the first year is devoted to the basic medical sciences, and the second year is devoted to the basic clinical disciplines. After those two years, the student enrolls in the Law School, taking the prescribed first-year courses. After completing seventy-two credits in the Law School, the student returns to the Medical School for elective clinical work tailored to the student’s specialized interests. The student will complete eighteen additional semester hours (two summer sessions) of basic science work.

he Law School and Nicholas School of the Environment have established a combined four-year program in law and graduate level environmental management. Acceptance into this program requires applying separately for admission to each school. The students in the JD/MEM program may enroll the first year in either the Nicholas School of the Environment or the Law School. If the student begins in the former, the first-year curriculum is the same as that of other Nicholas School students; if the student begins in the latter, the first-year curriculum is the same as that of other law students. The student’s second year consists of the full first-year program of the other school. In the third and fourth years of the program, the student takes courses in both schools. Approximately two-thirds of these courses are taken in the Law School.

The Law School and the Terry Sanford Institute of Public Policy have established a combined four-year program in law and graduate level policy studies. Acceptance into this program requires applying separately for admission to each school. The students in the JD/MPP program may enroll the first year in either the Terry Sanford Institute of Public Policy or the Law School. If the student begins in the former, the first-year curriculum is the same as that of other Sanford Institute students; if the student begins in the latter, the first-year curriculum is the same as that of other law students. The student's second year consists of the full first-year program of the other school. In the third and fourth years of the program, the student takes courses in both schools. Approximately two-thirds of these courses are taken in the Law School.

The Law School and Divinity School have established a combined four-year program in law and theological studies. Acceptance into this program requires applying separately for admission to each school. The students in the JD/MTS program may enroll the first year in either the Divinity School or the Law School. If the student begins in the former, the first-year curriculum is the same as that of other Divinity School students; if the student begins in the latter, the first-year curriculum is the same as that of other law students. The student’s second year consists of the full first-year program of the other school. In the third and fourth years of the program, the student takes courses in both schools. Approximately two-thirds of these courses are taken in the Law School.

There are a number of housing options available to Duke Law students and their families. Off-campus apartments are by far the most popular option, but a number of students also rent or purchase single-family homes as well, due to the relatively low home prices in Durham compared to other cities. There is also a very limited amount of on-campus housing.

Although it is always better to find housing as soon as possible, the Durham housing market is not as tight as in many larger cities. Most apartments and rental homes experience a good amount of turnover each year, and they usually require 60 days notice from current residents who intend to move out, so for example they will know May 1 what apartments they will have available July 1. Keep in mind that the peak month to move-out is May and the peak month to move-in is August, so many apartments offer extra incentives to those willing to move in earlier in the summer.

On-campus housing for graduate and professional students is provided in an undergraduate complex and is extremely limited, with priority is given to students arriving from abroad on student visa status, and who have never attended school outside of their home country before.
Each year Duke Community Housing surveys graduate and professional students about their off-campus living experiences. Survey results can be found at Duke Community Housing and include student reviews of different apartment complexes as well as neighborhoods.

Perhaps the greatest mark of Duke's excellence as a law school is the extraordinarily high caliber of its faculty. Faculty scholars are in demand nationally and internationally for their expertise, and they bring that expertise, and their real-world experience, into the classroom.
Duke law faculty engage in research and professional activities related to a wide range of issues in constitutional law, corporate law, sports law, national security, intellectual property, human rights law, and many other important fields. These faculty offer opportunities to students to collaborate on their research, assist them in pro bono activities, and help them develop special programs and events.

In the last decade, Duke Law School students have enjoyed remarkable success in realizing career goals. As employers from across the United States and abroad continue to recruit and hire our students, opportunities to embark on an exciting legal career abound.

he Career & Professional Development Center (Career Center) plays a significant role in helping students prepare for all aspects of their employment pursuits through a wide variety of educational, developmental and counseling services. In addition to resume preparation and interview training, the Career Center presents informative career panels, speakers and workshops throughout the year designed to educate Duke Law students on all aspects of the legal practice. With this assistance, Duke Law students obtain positions with private law firms, government agencies, public interest organizations, corporations, and federal and state judges.

Much of the hiring of our students is facilitated through Duke Law’s extensive on-campus interview program, one of the largest among all American law schools. Each fall approximately 300 legal employers visit the Duke campus to interview second- and third-year law students for summer clerkships as well as permanent employment. We also host a myriad of legal employers each spring for first-year on-campus recruiting. In addition to our on-campus programs, Duke students have the opportunity to participate in regional and practice specific job fairs. We look forward to meeting each student’s individualized needs.

The Law Library and the departments of Computing Services and Educational Technologies comprise Duke Law School Information Services. Our mission is to provide comprehensive and innovative information services to support scholarship, learning, and the programs of the law school; and to engage all members of the law school community in identifying their information and technology needs; thereby playing a key role in the continuing excellence of the law school.

The law library collection contains nearly 600,000 volumes. The core of the collection consists of virtually all reported decisions of the federal, state and territorial courts of the United States, the British Commonwealth, and representative foreign jurisdictions. It also includes the constitutions, codes, statutes, and subsidiary legislative publications of these jurisdictions, as well as digests, indexes, bibliographies and related research tools.
A large section of the library collection is devoted to treatises on all areas of law, and works in the fields of history, economics, government and other social and behavioral sciences relevant to legal research. Selected government documents and pamphlets are also available. The library maintains subscriptions to all current legal periodicals of general interest printed in the English language, many nonlegal periodicals, and most major legal periodicals published in foreign languages.

Experience is an invaluable form of instruction, which is why Duke Law School maintains one of the highest quality clinical programs in the country. Students can choose to pursue experiential learning opportunities in a number of different legal clinics by providing direct services to underserved client populations under the supervision of Duke Law faculty members.

The experiential learning available through these clinics is an important part of professionalism and leadership training at the Law School, designed to develop leadership values and skills such as collaboration, responsibility, management and service. These skills can also be developed in one of the many opportunities provided by the Pro Bono Project.

A large percentage of Duke Law students participate in our public interest and pro bono programs. Some take on significant commitments with organizations such as the Guardian Ad Litem Program, or the Public Defender's Office. Others may choose to swing a hammer or wield a paintbrush as part of our Dedicated to Durham initiative, highlighted by two annual School-wide community outreach days. Our Office of Public Interest and Pro Bono also offers a book club and speaker series, an annual overnight retreat in the North Carolina mountains, and fundraising activities through the Public Interest Law Foundation in support of public interest summer fellowships.

It is not really possible to separate 'classroom life' from 'extra-curricular life' at Duke Law School. What goes on outside of the classroom is important to the intellectual, personal and professional development of our students. The Law School offers an extraordinary range of activities, designed not only to provide relevant substantive information about law and the profession, but also to promote some of the most critical values of a professional legal education: appreciation and respect for diverse needs, interests and perspectives; self-knowledge; the responsible use of power; and a willingness to abide by the principles of civil discourse.

The Duke Law experience is enlivened by a diverse student body that brings together people of various social, ethnic, racial and geographic backgrounds. Through structured activities and informal encounters, students benefit from the experiences and perspectives of their peers on a daily basis. There are more than 30 student organizations at Duke Law School, running the gamut from the Duke Bar Association (the student governing body), eight academic journals , award-winning moot court teams, and numerous other student organizations and clubs. Students who identify an opportunity to create a new group to enhance the life of the Law School take the initiative to form it, as Nicole Crawford '03 and Susan Wood '02 did in forming Lawyers as Leaders, a student group that encourages and supports leadership qualities in students in preparation for whatever paths their legal careers may take.

It is a rare day at the Law School when there is not an outside speaker, panel discussion, conference, symposium, town meeting, brown-bag lunch forum, faculty workshop or public lecture. For example, in March 2004, the Global Capital Markets Center hosted its third Directors' Education Institute, which attracted leading public figures in business and capital markets from around the country to address issues faced by board chairs, corporate directors, and senior executive officers of publicly-traded corporations. Another recent example was a conference hosted by the Arts Project of the Center for the Study of the Public Domain at Duke, in conjunction with the Full Frame Documentary Film Festival, entitled Framed! Culture on the Legal Cutting Room Floor. An exciting one-day conference that brought together filmmakers, entertainment lawyers and executives, musicians, and legal scholars to explore how intellectual property laws construct and constrain popular culture.

International studies is a focus throughout the curriculum. Students examine international and comparative dimensions of the law not only in specialized courses, but also in classes in commercial and corporate law, family law, environmental law, criminal law, intellectual property law, sports law, and other fields that often cross national boundaries. Located in North Carolina's technology-focused Research Triangle area, Duke Law School has established itself as one of the leading law schools in the nation.

Outside the classroom, Duke students are encouraged to share their diverse perspectives and experiences through a myriad of extra-curricular activities, symposia, and special events examining international issues or featuring international leaders. A recent and popular tradition early in the fall is International Week, which features a full schedule of intellectual and cultural events.

The Law School increasingly has become an international institution, with students on campus from more than 35 countries around the world, and faculty consulting with and assisting foreign governments on legal and policy issues. Faculty advise around the world – on issues such as diverse as the scientific standards for global environmental regulation, Russian tax reform, constitution-building in Afghanistan, a new national stock exchange in Saudi Arabia, and issues of global capital markets in China.

Duke’s international presence is further boosted by summer institutes in transnational law in Geneva and Asia (ordinarily occurring in Hong Kong, the Asia program was moved temporarily to Fukuoka, Japan for Summer 2004) that are unmatched in their scope and quality, and by exchange programs and relationships with 14 foreign universities in, among other locations, Australia, China, Japan, France, Mexico, England, Kazakstan, Korea and South Africa. Over 10% of Duke Law School alumni live and practice abroad, providing Duke students with an invaluable international network of professional contacts and career opportunities.

Duke Law School is part of one of the world's pre-eminent research and teaching universities. Chartered in 1924, Duke University educates 6,000 undergraduate students from over 40 countries, and 5,000 graduate and professional students in business, divinity, engineering, the environment, law, medicine, and the arts and sciences.

A significant percentage of the student body comes to Duke from outside of the United States. Law students have the opportunity to participate in an enormous range of cultural, intellectual, and sporting activities across the greater Duke community. One-quarter or more of Duke Law students pursue a joint degree, and most joint-degree programs place students in contact with students and faculty in other schools and programs at Duke. This closeness adds an additional level of educational and intellectual stimulation to the Duke Law experience.



School name:Duke UniversityDuke Law School
Address:Science Drive and Towerview Road
Zip & city:NC 27708 North Carolina
Phone:919-613-7020
Web:http://www.law.duke.edu
Rate:


Total:
( vote)


Visits:
1914  



Duke Law School Law School Location






Other law schools in Durham

North Carolina Central University (School of Law)
The School of Law is located on the campus of North Carolina Central University at the corner of Cecil Street and South Alston Avenue in the Albert L....
Address: 1512 S. Alston Avenue