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Willamette University (College of Law)




As you would expect from a school with nearly 120 years of history behind it, Willamette University College of Law has a rock-solid national reputation. In combination with your hard work, Willamette will instill in you a comprehensive understanding of the law, along with highly refined skills in problem-solving, research and writing. Perhaps most important of all, you will emerge with a greatly enhanced ability to think clearly, soundly, quickly. You will notice we did not say legally. Willamette Law does not produce clones. Some of the most watched, most emulated legal education programs in the country will prepare you to travel the undiscovered country of tomorrow:

* Willamette’s innovative Center for Dispute
Resolution, the first of its kind in the West, is a
national model and offers an innovative certificate
in dispute resolution.
* Three additional certificate programs prepare
Willamette students to practice in a global
environment: business law, international and
comparative law, and law and government.
* For unique preparation for a future in which law and
management will continue to merge, you can choose
the flexibility of a joint degree (J.D./M.B.A.) with
Willamette’s Atkinson Graduate School of
Management.

You will be tested and strengthened by a strong, integrated curriculum – enhanced by extensive opportunities for research and study. Multiple resources are available to support your efforts. The College of Law is housed in a state-of-the- science learning facility, the Truman Wesley Collins Legal Center. The Center is open a reassuring and occasionally intimidating 24 hours a day. There are two sophisticated computer labs, in addition to the online and printed materials in the 285,000-volume J.W. Long Law Library. Students are fortunate to have available to them, within several blocks, the collections of Willamette University’s Mark O. Hatfield Library, the Oregon Supreme Court Library, the Oregon State Library and the Oregon State Archives. The Mark O. Hatfield Library maintains a strong liberal arts and graduate business collection. The Oregon Supreme Court Library collection houses the briefs of the Oregon Supreme Court and the Oregon Court of Appeals and contains rare historical Commonwealth materials. The Oregon State Library is the official state government documents depository and the Oregon State Archives house all historical Oregon legislative documents.

Brilliance often has little relation to teaching ability. Understanding that, College of Law faculty have been chosen and rewarded for their ability to excite, to explain, to inspire. They just happen to bring brilliance along with them as icing on the cake. Here you will learn with some of the most respected legal minds in America, including four Fulbright scholars and two former Oregon State Supreme Court justices. To the classroom each day they bring years of expertise, insight and experience. They demonstrate that reality and creativity are not mutually exclusive. And, by design, classes are small, so you will work one-on-one with these faculty – by graduation you will have discovered lifelong mentors and friends. Along with the hours these mentors devote to your progress, they also are known for groundbreaking legal research and publication. The Willamette faculty is augmented by many guest speakers, visiting campus with new legal theories and fresh perspectives on a range of issues.

Do not underestimate the power of the final piece in your education: your classmates. They are the fellow travelers with whom you will share the challenging journey of law school. You will soar – and sometimes struggle – with them. Many will become close to you; a few will remain friends and colleagues for life. You will learn from these people, in part because they will be different than you. They will come from all over America and from several nations. They will be bright, competitive and diverse. They will represent many backgrounds. All of you will benefit from the connection with each other – and from a strong bond with the more than 4,500 Willamette law alumni living in the United States and throughout the world. The framework of your professional life resides in all these people.

At the core of the law is the ability to analyze a cascade of facts and to appreciate nuance in the search for clarity and truth. Not so different from evaluating law schools. Here is the truth: there are many good law schools. We make the case that Willamette is unique for its historical capital city location, for its innovative curriculum, for its focus on preparing you for a fast-changing and often unforeseeable future, for both the aptitude and the attitude of its faculty, for its powerful links to business and government, and for the dynamic network of teachers, classmates and alumni. Test our case: read on. The difference is in the details.

The Willamette University College of Law is housed in the award-winning Truman Wesley Collins Legal Center across the street from the main campus of Willamette University. It has been cited as one of the three finest law school facilities in America. The bright, modern classrooms (with wireless access) are designed to maximize discussion and interaction, creating a comfortable environment for learning. The Collins Legal Center also houses a contemporary courtroom, the Center for Dispute Resolution, the Oregon Law Commission, the John C. Paulus Great Hall (the law school's lecture facility and public auditorium) and the J.W. Long Law Library. The offices for the Clinical Law Program are in Lee House on the main campus. Both the Collins Legal Center and the Law Library are open 24 hours a day. Few law schools grant students this degree of trust and privilege. At Willamette University College of Law, students are treated like the professionals they will become.

The J.W. Long Law Library contains a comprehensive law collection tailored to the law school curriculum. Its 285,000 volumes and microform equivalents include state and federal primary law sources, as well as the leading treatises, periodicals and other secondary sources that are vital to a full understanding of American law. The Law Library also has special collections in public international law, tax law and labor law and is a Selective Federal Government Documents Depository.

The J.W. Long Law Library, which anchors the north end of the Collins Legal Center, is designed to facilitate student use, convenience and comfort. A three-story glass facade transmits natural light to carrels, tables and lounge seating in an atmosphere conducive to studying. A main floor reading lounge offers students a large selection of popular magazines and newspapers for their enjoyment. Two quiet reading lounges provide comfortable seating for study, rest or reflection. Small conference and video rooms offer additional study options. Conference rooms may be reserved for periods of two hours per group. Study carrels are found throughout the three floors of the Law Library. Students can opt to share an assigned study carrel during the academic year.

Professional reference librarians are available to assist law students with all aspects of manual and electronic legal research, including use of the Internet, Lexis, Westlaw and other research applications on the law school network.

The Law Library maintains an honor system that places a special trust in its students to respect its collection and facilities. Consistent with a sense of community that is based upon professional courtesy and responsibility, law and law/management joint degree students have 24-hour access to the Law Library and all its resources. Other conveniences include free telephones for local and 800 number calling, fax machine use, email and Internet accounts and rules permitting non-alcoholic beverages in spill-proof containers. Headphones and tape players may be signed out at the circulation desk. Sample examinations authorized for publication by faculty members as study aids are posted to the Law Library website at www.willamette.edu/wucl/longlib/Exams. A student password is required for access.

The online library catalog includes print, audio, electronic and video entries for the J.W. Long and Mark O. Hatfield libraries, as well as the Oregon State Libray and the State of Oregon Law Library (Oregon Supreme Court). Other online library catalogs, including Summit, the academic union catalog for the Northwest, may be searched from our catalog. Students may access the online catalog from any campus terminal and from any home or other off-campus terminal equipped with a modem. Online research resources for Willamette users include: Academic Universe, Congressional Universe (CIS - Congressional Information Service), Environmental Law Reporter Newsletter, Hatfield Library Research, Lexis Research, Lexis Law School Resources (includes Virtual Classroom and Career Library), LoisLaw Research, SearchBank (InfoTrac), Westlaw Research and Westlaw Law School Resources (includes TWEN and Jobs-on-Line).

Law students also have access to all the facilities of Willamette University, including the Goudy Dining Commons and The Bistro, University Center, the Willamette Store and much more. The Sparks Physical Education and Recreation Center is one of the finest athletic facilities in the region, housing a swimming pool, handball/racquetball courts, weight room, gymnasiums and shower and locker facilities. The University's Hallie Ford Museum of Art is the third largest art museum in the state. The G. Herbert Smith Auditorium hosts the Oregon Symphony's performances in Salem. The recently completed Mary Stuart Rogers Music Center offers state-of-the-art acoustics for small performances of jazz, choral music, chamber music and recitals. The campus provides intramural sports, cultural offerings, student organizations, special events and lectures, as well as the stimulation of 2,100 other Willamette students.

As you would expect from a school with nearly 120 years of history behind it, Willamette University College of Law has a rock-solid national reputation. In combination with your hard work, Willamette will instill in you a comprehensive understanding of the law, along with highly refined skills in problem-solving, research and writing. Perhaps most important of all, you will emerge with a greatly enhanced ability to think clearly, soundly, quickly. You'll notice we did not say legally. Willamette Law doesn't produce clones. Some of the most watched, most emulated legal education programs in the country will prepare you to travel the undiscovered country of tomorrow:

* Willamette's innovative Center for Dispute Resolution, the first of its kind in the West, is a national model and offers an innovative certificate in dispute resolution.

* Three additional certificate programs prepare Willamette students to practice in a global environment: law and business, international and comparative law, and law and government.

* For unique preparation for a future in which law and management will continue to merge, you can choose the flexibility of a joint degree (J.D./M.B.A.) with Willamette's Atkinson Graduate School of Management.

You will be tested and strengthened by a strong, integrated curriculum - enhanced by extensive opportunities for research and study. Multiple resources are available to support your efforts. The College of Law is housed in a state-of-the-art learning facility, the Truman Wesley Collins Legal Center. The Center is open a reassuring and occasionally intimidating 24 hours a day. There are two sophisticated computer labs, in addition to the online and printed materials in the 285,000-volume J.W. Long Law Library. Students are fortunate to have available to them, within several blocks, the collections of Willamette University's Mark O. Hatfield Library, the Oregon Supreme Court Library, the Oregon State Library and the Oregon State Archives. The Mark O. Hatfield Library maintains a strong liberal arts and graduate business collection. The Oregon Supreme Court Library collection houses the briefs of the Oregon Supreme Court and the Oregon Court of Appeals and contains rare historical Commonwealth materials. The Oregon State Library is the official state government documents depository and the Oregon State Archives house all historical Oregon legislative documents.

The Clinical Law Program comprises two advanced legal education courses that provide students with hands-on, professional experience in courtrooms and law offices throughout the country. The Civil Practice Clinic and Externship Program require second- and third-year law students to apply the doctrinal knowledge mastered in their fundamental coursework to the actual practice of law and to real-life observations of skilled practitioners and judges. The Clinical Law Program faculty strives to ensure that Willamette law students demonstrate the highest standards of excellence in all areas of legal practice, from mastery of substantive legal issues and procedures to unwavering professionalism and notable service to the greater community. The Clinical Law Program is generally the capstone of students’ legal education at Willamette.

Civil Practice Clinic
The Civil Practice Clinic gives Willamette students the opportunity to represent clients in actual cases and transactions under the close supervision of Willamette faculty. The goal of the program is to instill in our students a strong sense of professionalism, standards of excellence, and an appreciation for the importance of reflection and balance in the practice of law. Through the program, students have opportunities to represent real clients in transactional and litigation contexts.

Externship Program
The Externship Program immerses Willamette University College of Law students in the fast-paced work of the practicing lawyer. Students are partnered with attorneys working in various legal settings in the wider community. These students are able to participate in legal work in many different contexts, under the constraints of a real-life practice.

Willamette's first-year experience is distinctive. Both Legal Research and Writing and one substantive course are taught in small class sections limited to 30 students. This intellectual intimacy brings an unusual sense of collegiality to the traditionally competitive first-year.

The following courses are taught during the first year: Civil Procedure, Contracts, Property, Torts, Constitutional Law, Criminal Law, and Legal Research & Writing. First-year students also chose to take one of four electives: Dispute Resolution; International Law and Dispute Resolution; Introduction to Business Law: Economics, Finance and Risk; or Lawmaking Process. These electives are the required introductory courses for the four optional certificate programs offered by the College of Law.

About Legal Research & Writing
Writing and research are an integral part of any legal education. Willamette’s program is unique in that the required Legal Research and Writing class and additional substantive class are both kept small to ensure students receive personal attention and support. In the first semester of Legal Research and Writing, students are introduced to the basic principles of legal analysis, research and effective legal writing. They prepare case briefs, research assignments, and both closed- and open-universe research memoranda. In the second semester, students write more sophisticated memoranda and are trained in persuasive writing. The first year ends with a required appellate brief and moot court oral argument.

Faculty Advisors
Each student is assigned a faculty advisor who will be available to the student for questions about the academic program and other more general questions about adjusting to the law school program.

Students at Willamette University College of Law learn practical skills through simulation courses, moot court competitions, externships, experiences with actual clients in the Clinical Law Program, and the programs of the Center for Dispute Resolution.

First-Year: Moot Court Competition
All members of the first-year class participate in the First Year Appellate Moot Court Competition. This annual event is the culmination of the first-year Legal Research and Writing course. As part of the course, each student is required to research and write an appellate brief. At a minimum, each student then argues twice before a panel of judges. Finalists will argue up to five times. Prizes are awarded on the quality of the student's oral argument. Some moot-court competitions have involved environmental law, international law, labor law, negotiation, or client-council law; others are sponsored by the Oregon Trial Lawyer's Association and the American Bar Association.

Second Year: Professional Responsibility
All second-year students are required to enroll in Professional Responsibility. Ethical responsibilities of the lawyer are examined in the course. Considerable emphasis is placed on the Code of Professional Responsibility of the American Bar Association.

Third Year: Trial Practice
A practical approach is taken in this course for third-year students interested in careers as trial lawyers. Students argue criminal and civil cases before faculty and members of the bench and bar. A trial is divided into component parts, and each student is required to handle pleading, voir dire, opening statement, direct examination, cross examination, introduction of exhibits, preparation of instructions, and closing argument.

Court Certification
Students may become court certified after their second year at Willamette, according to provisions established by the American Bar Association and the Oregon State Bar. Court certification permits the law student, with the supervision of a practicing attorney, to argue in an Oregon courtroom. Other academic and professional requirements must also be met before court certification is approved.

Simulation Courses
Simulation courses focus on the professional skills needed by lawyers. Workshops in negotiation and mediation, trial practice, interview and counseling and pre-trial civil litigation are taught by a combination of full-time and adjunct professors. The adjunct professors who teach trial practice are chosen because of their trial experience and their teaching ability. They give students the opportunity to see many different styles of trial advocacy.

The Willamette University College of Law faculty understands that wisdom is the one commodity that increases the more it is given away.

A hallmark of the Willamette tradition of academic excellence is the outstanding quality of Willamette's law faculty. Willamette's law professors are graduates of some of the finest law schools, including Chicago, Cornell, Harvard, Michigan, Northwestern, Stanford, Virginia, and Willamette; they all excelled in and after law school and compiled enviable professional records before they became law professors. They were all brilliant, accomplished, and productive before they joined this faculty — and they remain so.

Our small faculty has one of the highest percentages of Fulbright scholars and includes three of the five officers of the American Society of Comparative Law, two of the 12 American Titular members of the International Academy of Comparative Law, two former Oregon Supreme Court justices and a CALI Trademark Fellow.

But far more than this, Willamette faculty members share a deep love of and commitment to teaching for its own sake. Full-time faculty conduct research and serve the community with their professional skills — but always, the first priority is teaching.

Without a doubt, you will read a similar statement from every law school in the country. Like the Willamette University College of Law environment itself, this teaching priority is something that will attain true substance for you only when you talk directly with Willamette students, faculty and alumni; and when you have been to the campus to feel and understand the depth of the singular commitment to learning.

You will benefit from this during all of your years here. You will benefit as well from the insights and perspectives brought to the classroom by the talented practitioners and respected jurists who are Willamette's adjunct professors.

Given Willamette's small size, the expertise of its faculty is unusually broad. You will find professors recognized nationally for their contributions to the law, particularly in the areas of commercial and business law, labor law, international law, property law, environmental law, tax law, trial advocacy and dispute resolution. These are not people you will see once a week behind the distant podium of a lecture hall - these are teachers with whom you will interact, one-to-one, throughout your training.



School name:Willamette UniversityCollege of Law
Address:245 Winter Street S.E.
Zip & city:OR 97301 Oregon
Phone:503-370-6282
Web:http://www.willamette.edu/wucl
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